Greene and Anderson Counties Are Dangerous Places to be Married in Tennessee

28 September, 2009 by Lawrence in Uncategorized

It’s true, according to this graphic.   The Census Bureau says that 9% of people in Greene and Anderson counties are widowed, which makes those the two most dangerous places to live in Tennessee if you’re married.  Married people living in those counties should get out.  Now.

Before you send me any hate mail, the paragraph above is entirely tongue-in-cheek.  I discovered that graphic while surfing, and I found the numbers to be interesting.

Single and Looking?

If you’re looking for a single person who has not tested the waters of married life, your best bets are Davidson and Shelby counties, where 35 and 37 percent of people have never been married at all.  Davidson county also leads the state in divorce, where 15% of people are divorced.  Shelby is a bit behind with only 11 percent of residents having been divorced.

Where Are the Married People?

Married couples should not be difficult to find in Montgomery, Sumner, Greene, and Sullivan counties, where at least 60% of residents are married.  I’ve already poked fun at Greene county, but in Sullivan county 8% of the population is also widowed.

What Does it All Mean?

Quite frankly, I have no idea.   What I would mention is that divorce still seems to carry somewhat of a stigma, at least to some people.  Clients come to me sometimes feeling humiliated that they are having to end their marriage.  Some of them feel it is an indication of some sort of failure on their part.

It shouldn’t be this way any more.  In Davidson county, about 1 out of every 7 adults are divorced (I’m assuming these statistics apply to people of marrying age).  We should be past the point where there is any shame in ending a marriage that isn’t working any more.  What’s worse, staying in a relationship where everybody is miserable, or casting off that burden and seeking happiness elsewhere?

What do you think these numbers mean?  Is there some obvious meaning I’m missing here?

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